Monday, 19 June 2017

Sociology achieves Bronze Award from Green Impact



We're delighted to announce that Sociology has achieved a Bronze Award from Green Impact for our efforts at greening the department.  We were particularly proud of managing to raise sufficient funds to twin two of our toilets (see: http://www.yott.info/)!  We couldn't have achieved the award without our fantastic student helper - Katy Forsyth - who was trained by the central Green Impact organisers, and is also a student in Sociology.  Beyond supporting our team, Katy also organised a vegan cake sale to support St Nicks (see: http://stnicks.org.uk/) and helped pot up baby spider plants to give away to fellow students.  


For more information on sustainability at York, see: http://www.york.ac.uk/about/sustainability/

L to R: Will Patterson, Merran Toerien, Saul Tendler

Thursday, 8 June 2017

Border Zones: Documenting Life and Work Carried Out under Precarious Conditions

Wednesday 14 June 2017, 4.00pm to 5:00pm

Speaker: Professor and filmmaker Jan Haaken
From NGOs, activist and arts-based projects to programs of research, feminists have sought and secured space for re-presenting women in the visual field. Feminist projects grounded in visual methods have tended to be under-theorized, however, in relying on the power of the image itself - particularly images of female suffering - to subvert the male gaze. Since visual images often invoke the spectator experience of unmediated access to the inner world of the subject, the evocative power of photographic images may readily reproduce forms of voyeurism.
Professor and filmmaker Jan Haaken takes up these theoretical, ethical and methodological dilemmas in a presentation preceding the screening of her recent film, KUWEPO (running time 24 minutes)
KUWEPO” (“Being There” in Swahili) follows the daily lives of providers in Kenya as they work within the 2010 liberalized constitution to provide post-abortion care for women.  The film shows how providers in a range of neighborhoods and clinical settings operate within this new political landscape, even as reforms in the law continue to put women at risk for medical problems and death from unsafe abortions.
The screening is followed by discussion moderated by Professor Maggie O’Neill.
Jan Haaken is professor emeritus of psychology at Portland State University, a clinical psychologist, and documentary filmmaker.  Haaken is author of Pillar of Salt: Gender, Memory and the Perils of Looking Back and Hard Knocks; Domestic Violence and the Psychology of Storytelling. She has directed and/or produced six feature-length films, including “Diamonds, Guns and Rice,” “Moving to the Beat,” “Guilty Except for Insanity,” “Mind Zone: Therapists Behind the Front Lines,” and “Milk Men: The Life and Times of Dairy Farmers.” She has directed five short films, including two recent films on abortion providers produced through a team at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor that carries out anti-stigma research.
Location: Environment Building ENV/005
Admission: FREE (Eventbrite ticket)

Fully funded PhD in STS available from October 2017


SATSU has available a fully funded (fees and stipend) PhD, supported by the ESRC Doctoral Training Programme. This will be to work on understanding the role patient charities play in shaping biomedicial innovation. Full details are at:
https://www.york.ac.uk/sociology/postgraduate/phd-mphil/pgt_funding/#tab-5

Friday, 2 June 2017

Traversing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Social Research Conference Round-up

Traversing Boundaries took place on 25 May 2017 at the University of York for postgraduate students to meet and share ideas on interdisciplinarity. Despite being organised by PGR students in the Department of Sociology, we were delighted to welcome speakers, keynotes and delegates from across disciplines for a vibrant discussion on the challenges and opportunities offered by traversing disciplinary boundaries.
 

One of the keynotes, Dr Des Fitzgerald from Cardiff University, spoke about the unspoken ‘grubby’ realities of grappling with theory or method outside of the constraints of traditional taxonomy. He discussed the embodiment of research in the negotiation of commitments and the difficulties of crafting an academic identity between boundaries when jobs or journals tend to work within disciplinary constraints.
 

Dr Des Fitzgerald introduced by Prof. Joanna Latimer.
Whether interdisciplinary work is considered a trendy or embarrassing concern in academia, the event proved a vibrant space to explore how interdisciplinarity is made sense of by early career scholars and how it manifests in practice through imaginative means and impactful collaborations. The day ended by raising the question; is it possible for a scholar not to traverse boundaries and how can we embrace post-disciplinary thinking?
If you missed the event, the programme of speakers can be found here and the conversation continues on Twitter @isrconference17.
Many thanks to the Department of Sociology, Centre for Modern Studies and White Rose DTC for their generous support.
 

Border Zones: Documenting Life and Work Carried Out under Precarious Conditions

Wednesday 14 June 2017, 4.00pm to 5:00pm

Speaker: Professor and filmmaker Jan Haaken
From NGOs, activist and arts-based projects to programs of research, feminists have sought and secured space for re-presenting women in the visual field. Feminist projects grounded in visual methods have tended to be under-theorized, however, in relying on the power of the image itself - particularly images of female suffering - to subvert the male gaze. Since visual images often invoke the spectator experience of unmediated access to the inner world of the subject, the evocative power of photographic images may readily reproduce forms of voyeurism.
Professor and filmmaker Jan Haaken takes up these theoretical, ethical and methodological dilemmas in a presentation preceding the screening of her recent film, KUWEPO (running time 24 minutes)
KUWEPO” (“Being There” in Swahili) follows the daily lives of providers in Kenya as they work within the 2010 liberalized constitution to provide post-abortion care for women.  The film shows how providers in a range of neighborhoods and clinical settings operate within this new political landscape, even as reforms in the law continue to put women at risk for medical problems and death from unsafe abortions.
The screening is followed by discussion moderated by Professor Maggie O’Neill.
Jan Haaken is professor emeritus of psychology at Portland State University, a clinical psychologist, and documentary filmmaker.  Haaken is author of Pillar of Salt: Gender, Memory and the Perils of Looking Back and Hard Knocks; Domestic Violence and the Psychology of Storytelling. She has directed and/or produced six feature-length films, including “Diamonds, Guns and Rice,” “Moving to the Beat,” “Guilty Except for Insanity,” “Mind Zone: Therapists Behind the Front Lines,” and “Milk Men: The Life and Times of Dairy Farmers.” She has directed five short films, including two recent films on abortion providers produced through a team at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor that carries out anti-stigma research.
Location: Environment Building ENV/005
Admission: FREE (Eventbrite ticket)

Friday, 12 May 2017

Dates confirmed for 2017/18 'suite' of CA skills training courses:

1. Turn-Taking: 28-30 Nov 2017

2. Sequence Organisation: 12-14 Dec 2017
3. Repair: 17-19 April 2018
4. Word Selection: 22-24 May 2018
More details to follow soon

Conversation Analysis: An Introduction and Overview 12 June 2017

In the last thirty years, Conversation Analysis has become the preeminent method for the analysis of naturally occurring interaction. Despite its name, CA studies all forms of talk-in-interaction in institutional or work related settings as well as in ordinary conversation. It also studies embodied behaviours such as gaze, gesture, and movement. 

In this course, we introduce the history and principles of CA, sketch some of its main analytic procedures, and show how it offers a indepth view of how we use talk in social interaction, and how these analytic practices inform a radical methodology in sociology.

This course is recommended for people with no prior knowledge of CA who just want to get a basic understanding of its distinctive approach, and those who intend to go on to take the more technical CA skills training programmes offered in the Department.

Course Leaders: The course team will be Robin Wooffitt and Darren Reed
Location: University of York, Research Centre for Social Sciences (RCSS)
Fee: £75 (which includes tea/coffee and materials
Please contact Sarah Shrive-Morrison to reserve your place 
sarah.shrive-morrison@york.ac.uk