Friday, 14 August 2015

New Editorial Board Member on Sociology Journal

Laurie HanquinetLaurie Hanquinet has joined the Editorial Board of Sociology along with existing member Nisha Kapoor from our department. 


Sociology is a leading journal in the field of Sociology in the UK whilst also offering internationally innovative publications in key sociological areas.

Congratulations Laurie!

Wednesday, 12 August 2015

New Handbook of Sociology of Arts and Culture

Image result for art and cultureLaurie Hanquinet is delighted to announce that her new book the Routledge Handbook of the Sociology of Arts and Culture (co-edited by Mike Savage) will come out at the end of the month. 
She worked for three years on this project and is very happy to see all her hard work turned into this fantastic book including captivating contributions of key authors in the field. 

The book offers a comprehensive overview of sociology of art and culture, focusing especially – though not exclusively – on the visual arts, literature, music, and digital culture.


Monday, 10 August 2015

The Value of Social Science

Image result for social scienceWant to understand how people tick? Want to explore todays big questions about society? The Guardian has released an article arguing that social science is the answer.

Click here: Study Social Science

We here in the Department of Sociology heartily agree!

Friday, 7 August 2015

The Politics of Data in Discover Society

Dave BeerThe new issue of Discover Society magazine focuses on the 'Politics of Data'. Dave Beer has an article in the issue on 'The growing power of the data analytics industry'. You can read the article here - Discover Society

And here is the opening paragraph:

Following the England cricket team’s recent elimination from the world cup, Peter Moores, the England coach, caused something of a stir by suggesting that ‘we shall have to look at the data’. The response in the media was one of consternation – as was the public response based on the 953 comments that the Guardian article alone has already received. Both Moores’ statement and the media response reveal something of the politics of data. Moores’ desire to return to the numbers is suggestive of how embedded and routine data analytics already are in the production and consumption of culture. Data are seen to provide the objective means by which people can be judged or pushed to compete in lots of different ways.

Thursday, 6 August 2015

Critical Health Psychology in South Africa

Merran Toerien and Clare Jackson presented at the conference for the International Society for Critical Health Psychology, held in July at Rhodes University in South Africa.

Image result for Rhodes universityMerran Toerien and Clare Jackson formed part of a symposium entitled 'Conversation analysis as critical analysis?', organised by Prof. Elizabeth Peel (University of Worcester) and chaired by Ryan du Toit (Rhodes University).  

The four papers broadly focussed on the use of conversation analysis (CA) to examine decision-making in clinical contexts, showing how CA can be used to illuminate the micro-social production of healthcare. Data from different clinical contexts formed the bases of the presentations.  
  • Ryan showed the complex interplay between the lifeworld of a service user and the biomedical world in which she was interacting with staff in a diabetic clinic.  
  • Clare explored the ways in which healthcare practitioners can open up or close down the interactional space for women to make decisions during childbirth.  
  • Merran presented data from neurology clinics, showing the complicated nature and unintended consequences of enacting NHS policy for patient-led care in situated interactions between staff and service users.  
  • Liz examined productions of diagnostic information about dementia in interactions between doctors and patients, showing how doctors are sensitive to the needs of patients and their families.