Friday, 26 February 2016

David Honeywell and Howard League Bulletin

Dave Honeywell has been published in the latest Howard League Bulletin. He has written a piece on transforming identities through higher education.

Tuesday, 23 February 2016

Protecting Choice and Refusing life-extending Interventions

Image result for celia kitzingerProfessor Celia Kitzinger has co-authored a report on how to promote understanding and uptake of 'Advance Decisions'. An Advance Decision  is a tool for people who want to protect their own choices if they lose capacity to speak for themselves (e.g. because of brain injury from a stroke or a car crash). For example, some people want to refuse interventions to artificially extend their lives if they are in a permanent vegetative state.

The report, co-authored with Professor Jenny Kitzinger (Cardiff University) was commissioned by the Welsh Minster for Health and Social Services.  It recommends a series of steps including public awareness campaigns (to counteract the widespread myth that a relative can refuse treatment on your behalf) and training for health care professionals (who often don’t understand the law in this area). The report, published this month, has prompted media attention,  been endorsed by leading barristers and GPs, and prompted extensive debate.  You can read the full findings and recommendations here: goo.gl/qeQuin

Celia Kitzinger and Sue Wilkinson are co-teaching a training course on how to help people write Advance Decisions.  It will run in May and is approved by the British Psychological Society.  Book your place here https://www.bps.org.uk/events/advance-decisions-refuse-treatment-“living-wills”-choices-end-life-part-2. Celia and Sue also regularly run training days on Advance Decisions for GPs and other crucial health care professionals, as well as providing support for individuals to write Advance Decisions for themselves.

Professor Celia Kitzinger says: “People often think it is complicated to write an Advance Decision – or that you need a lawyer.  This just isn’t true”. She says “It’s possible to record your wishes in under an hour by using a simple website such as www.mydecisions.org.uk. Then all you have to do is print it out, sign it, have it witnessed, and give it to the people who need to know about it".  Professor Sue Wilkinson adds: "Like wills, Advance Decisions are not just for terminally ill or elderly people.  We are all at risk of losing capacity to make our own decisions - for example after a car crash or sporting accident.  Everyone  should consider doing one!"

Thursday, 11 February 2016

Do new Government plans on prison reform go too far?

Dave Honeywell, a final year PhD researcher has been interviewed by The Mirror newspaper regarding his views on David Cameron's plans for reform in British prisons.

Follow the link: Prison reform?

Tuesday, 9 February 2016

Call for papers: Regulating Time Conference


 Sara Lando
The AHRC Regulating Time network - a collaboration between the Department (Sian Beynon-Jones) and Kent Law School  (Emily Grabham) - is holding an international conference The New Legal Temporalities: Discipline and Resistance across Domains of Time 8-10 September 2016, University of Kent.

Keynote: Carol Greenhouse (Anthropology, Princeton)

Plenary speakers:
  • Michelle Bastian (Philosophy, Edinburgh)
  • Sarah Keenan (Law, Birkbeck)
  • Dipika Jain (Law, Jindal Global Law School)
  • Justin Richland (Anthropology, Chicago)
Writer in residence: Annabel Lyon (prize-winning author of historical novels The Sweet Girl and The Golden Mean)

Law and governance are intimately entangled with time. This international conference will explore time’s fraught relationship with law, governance and ordering: the use of time in projects of discipline, the significance of time to resistance, the creation of new temporal horizons and experiences through technological innovation, as well as other themes.

Deadline for streams and panels: 15 February 2016

Deadline for individual abstracts: 29 February 2016

For full details, please see the network blog

Friday, 5 February 2016

Call For Papers - Contemporary Political Youth Culture and Communication Symposium

A two-day Symposium
University of York, UK
18-19 July 2016

Marking the launch of the Centre for Political Youth Culture and Communication (CPAC) this two-day international symposium explores the socio-cultural factors influencing the civic engagement of young people and its means of communicative expression. Young networking citizens in many parts of the world today play a crucial role in shaping the future prospects for democratic societies. The styles, nature and means of their political engagement is therefore of increasing importance to policy-makers and academics alike. This event is focused upon the communicative, emotional, embodied, and aesthetical modes of youth citizenship. It examines the social construction of the political identities of young people within the context of widening social inequality, climate change, reflexive individualism and a networked social media ecology.  We welcome papers drawing upon research and theory that address questions of contemporary political youth culture including, but not limited to, such topics as:

Citizenship norms                 Political talk                            Social networking

Precarious employment      Celebrity politics                   Personalisation

Identity politics                      Social movement protest    Community politics

Political socialisation            Civic education                      Political education

Transnational politics          Populist parties                     youth Campaigns

Migration politics                  Electoral engagement          



Keynote Speakers

Prof. Henrik Bang, University of Copenhagen and Canberra University
Prof. Lance Bennett, University of Washington
Prof. Donatella della Porta, European University Institute, Florenze


Conference organisers:

Brian D. Loader, University of York, brian.loader@york.ac.uk
Nathan Manning, University of York, nathan.manning@york.ac.uk
Nisha Kapoor, University of York, nisha.kapoor@york.ac.uk

Admin: Sarah Shrive-Morrison, sarah.shrive-morrison@york.ac.uk

Conference website
Registration Now OPEN
Conference Hotel     (PLEASE BOOK DIRECT VIA THIS EMAIL)



Key Dates
Please submit title, abstract and brief biography for consideration to 
brian.loader@york.ac.uk
by Monday 7 March 2016
Notification of decision Monday 14 March 2016

Thursday, 4 February 2016

BA Criminology Undergraduates work with the North Yorkshire Youth Commission

Following a call from the North Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner in July 2015 some of our BA Criminology Students have participated in the North Yorkshire Youth Commission. Ida Sadlowska, Fay Wileman, Sarah McMullen, Jake Longhorn, Amy Collingwood (all 2nd year), and Enya Lee and Samantha Burns (3rd year) all helped conduct a survey of some 1500 young people at various venues across the county to find out what they wanted from the police. They found that young people wanted police officers to be more consistent in how they interact with the age group and not judge them on age or appearance. A formal report is currently being collated.

Samantha Burns (far right) a BA Criminology Third year

Well done everyone involved!

Follow the links to York Press coverage of their work: Don't judge us by our age and Police Chiefs listen to Young People in North Yorkshire

Wednesday, 3 February 2016

Surveillance Society in Information, Communication and Society Journal

Rosie Smith, a first year doctoral student has had a book review published in Information, Communication and Society. She reviewed Monahan's (2013) SuperVision: an introduction to the surveillance society.

Rosie Smith
When asked why she has bothered to write a book review she says:

'Writing book reviews has been a great introductory way to ease myself in to publishing academic work. I’ve found it a good opportunity to read books that are both related to my thesis, but which also perhaps draw on wider themes that my research doesn’t necessarily always allow for. But more than this, it encourages me to critically engage with a piece of literature in its entirety, rather than favouring a more selective reading because of the time constraints of a PhD. As a result I feel am on a learning curve whereby I am constantly evaluating my work and thinking about my writing in a critical way, to ensure it strikes the balance between being academic, accessible, and clear. Not only is it a way of getting the odd free book, writing book reviews, so far, has been a friendly and less-pressurised way of entering the academic world.' 

Follow the link to access the review: SuperVision Review

Tuesday, 2 February 2016

Call for Papers: Discourse(s) in the Social Sciences Conference May 2016

Rosie Smith, Gillian Loomes and Germaine Stockbridge are organising the annual Sociology Postgraduate Conference. The event will be held on 10th May 2016 between10am-5pm at Kings Manor, University of York.

Confirmed keynote speakers are:

Robert Reiner
Professor Robert Reiner

Professor
Professor Charles Antaki

Call for Papers

We invite abstracts that deal with discourse in any thematic or methodological way.
Topics can include (but are certainly not limited to):
Conversation Analysis
Power, resistance and discourse
Crime and deviance and social control
Discourse and identity
Political discourses
Health, disability and lifestyle
Masters students and first year PhD students are especially welcome to submit an abstract, as this is an excellent chance to present your work in a constructive and supportive environment. Other postgraduate students and researchers are also more than welcome to submit.


If you are interested in presenting a paper, please submit an abstract of up to 350 words to discourses2016@york.ac.uk by Friday, 4 March 2016. Please indicate if you would like to be considered for a travel bursary. 

3 New Short Courses in CA announced

Workshop on Action Sequencing with Gene Lerner and Ray Wilkinson,
University of York, 16-17 June 2016

Action Sequencing Workshop
Gene Lerner and Ray Wilkinson
16-17 June 2016, University of York

Intensive ‘hands on’ workshop with leading conversation analysts:
Professor Gene Lerner, Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Professor Ray Wilkinson, Human Communication Sciences, University of Sheffield, UK

12 places only – likely to be over-subscribed, so register your interest early to avoid disappointment!

Cost: £150


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Additional skills-based training courses in Conversation AnalysisOctober 2016, University of York

Developing Conversation Analytic Skills 3: Repair (3 days)

Tutors to include: Sue Wilkinson and Celia Kitzinger
Date: 11 – 13 October 2016

Pre-requisites: Developing Conversation Analytic Skills 1 and 2 (Turn-taking and Sequence Organisation)

This course is one of two – on repair and on word selection – designed to provide further core training in conversation analysis (CA).

It will provide a systematic grounding in the CA domain of repair.  It will be an intensive course, limited to 12 participants.  The course will be taught via mini-lectures, practical activities and exercises, with an emphasis on hands-on work with data.  It is intended for those with some prior familiarity with CA – especially turn-taking and sequence organisation – who want to acquire key skills for working with conversational data.  It is not necessary for participants to have their own data set.

Location: University of York

Cost: £360 (to include course materials, lunches, tea & coffee)


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Developing Conversation Analytic Skills 4: Word Selection (3 days)

Tutors to include: Sue Wilkinson, Clare Jackson and Celia Kitzinger
Date: 18 – 20 October 2016

Pre-requisites: Developing Conversation Analytic Skills 1 and 2 (Turn-taking and Sequence Organisation)

This course is one of two – on word selection and repair – designed to provide further core training in conversation analysis (CA).

It will provide a systematic grounding in the CA domain of word selection.  It will be an intensive course, limited to 12 participants.  The course will be taught via mini-lectures, practical activities and exercises, with an emphasis on hands-on work with data.  It is intended for those with some prior familiarity with CA – especially turn-taking and sequence organisation – who want to acquire key skills for working with conversational data.  It is not necessary for participants to have their own data set.

Location: University of York

Cost: £360 (to include course materials, lunches, tea & coffee)